The Ever-Evolving Kitchen

The Ever-Evolving Kitchen

One day the entire kitchen is getting a proper renovation. Until that time comes I am constantly reconfiguring it trying to keep it functional for a family of seven. 

I built a new island to replace the last one. This one is sturdier and offers more storage space. I reused the top from the old one.

As it was before:

Cute, but wobbly and limited for storage. 

I took off the legs and used two of them to beef up my standard chalkboard. A fence board across the top and bottom and some paint and voila! (try that recipe btw-it’s DELISH):

I fabbed up a new island using some scrap pieces from the stash and put the old top on the new island:

Here she is in the kitchen!

My new bakin’ station is looking pretty nice! Thanks for looking Xx

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Apothecary

Apothecary

I’ve been storing my random dried herbs and tinctures etc in various paper bags around the house because I didn’t have a proper place for them all. 

When I saw these boxes at the local Dollarama for 3 bucks each I had a light bulb moment! 

But it took 6 months of annoying the employees by phone and in person about their stock before I had enough of them to start the project (which incidentally gave me just enough time to receive chinese-order card cabinet pulls)

Theres a really awesome tutorial (and project) at debisdesigndiary.com on how to achieve a chippy weathered boat paint finish so I took some hints from her hilarious how-to and made up some chunky paint to ‘paint’ my boxes. I used playing cards to spread the paint. It took a few boxes to get the hang of the effect but I love how letting the paint thicken creates this awesome old finish effect where the paint edges are thick and defined like they were chipped off. You just can’t achieve that effect with normal quality paint. She says to use acrylic but I only had latex acrylic on hand and it did the job well-enough.
My strategy involved globbing the paint randomly on the surface and then dragging the face of the card across at just the right pressure to ALMOST but NOT COMPLETELY spread the paint.

Originally I really wanted a mashup of all kinds of layers of chippy color showing through but in the end I decided to go with a really muted green. I was SO tempted to Paint it White lol!

Another layer of even lighter green and then some scraping and sanding, followed by gluing all the boxes together and finally adding the hardware and:

Done!

It’s just resting on a shelf for now because I literally JUST finished it and havent decided where to put it yet. 

Looks old right? 

The cost of the boxes was about 40 bucks and the hardware totalled around 20 so it did end up being a costly project when you factor in time spent on it. 

But I am so excited to be able to actually properly keep my dried citrus peels, mints, echinacea heads, rose hips, oils, salves, waxes and butters, tinctures and whatever other garden treasures need saving!! All I need now is labels 🤗

 Happy New Year ♡ -Destiny

Frugal Tree Flocking with Dollarstore Supplies

Frugal Tree Flocking with Dollarstore Supplies

My mom in law told me that flocking your Christmas Tree is something they did back in the 80s but evidently it’s back in style again! Shopping around town I saw price tags as high as $300 for a flocked tree and that’s way out of the price range for a lady who already has a perfectly good fake tree at home.

I started drybrushing white paint on my old tree branches at home which looked ok but didn’t give it much texture or dimension.

BUT while in the craft section at my local Dollarama, I came across a bag of ‘paper mache fibre’ for 3 bucks. It looked well-enough like snow so I set out to do some flocking with it!

I watered down elmers glue and applied it everywhere I wanted the flocking to stick and then just sprinkled the mache fibre on top. 

Yes, it was a messy process!

Here’s some progress pics as I added finished branches to the tree:

You can see that it did flake and leave a mess as I put the branches back on the tree. The mache fibre came smelling kinda gluey so I assumed that wetting it would harden it. So I spritzed the finished tree with water. It worked! It set the remaining flocking perfectly and reduced the actual snowing-down of remaining fibre. 

Not bad for $3 and some glue and paint I already had on hand! 

Here it is all set up after the kids and I put all of our decorations up and topped it with the star I made out of old chair spindles and my granny’s crocheted tablecloth as the tree skirt

And a letter A for the Ashdown Family ♡

Merry Christmas Xx

Upcycled Chair Spindle Tree Topper/Star

Upcycled Chair Spindle Tree Topper/Star

I have been set on doing a really elaborate rustic farmhouse style Christmas Tree this year and it seems that anything of quality at the local stores costs an arm and a leg. So I got on Pinterest and found some cute wooden stars that piqued my interest and got to thinking about how I could make my own.

I’ve had a small collection of dowels/spindles from the various wooden chairs that have broken over the years in our house and decided to wing it and I love how it turned out!

I taped and then predrilled holes to screw the dowels together in the shape of a star.

I had an old tree topper with some lights in it that I wanted to use on the new topper so I took it apart and saved the lights

I gave the new star a quick coat of paint and hotglued some pinecones and foliage to it, wrapped the lights around it, and- TaDa! Pretty darn cute 🙂

I even turned a wire coat hanger into the mounting spring by twisting it around a pole in the drill to get the shape and inserting it into a predrilled hole in the star.

I never set up the tree until after my sons birthday at the end of November but I’m excited to see how it looks all lit up atop the family tree!